David L. Gibbs Interviewed by LexisNexis About Online Q&A Sites

Recently, Senior Partner David L. Gibbs of The Gibbs Law Firm, APC was asked by LexisNexis | Martindale-Hubbell to discuss Legal Question & Answer Forums. The interview, which originally appeared on the Law Firm Marketing site of LexisNexis on February 7, 2013 addresses the benefits of such forums for both consumers seeking legal advice as well as attorneys. Mr. Gibbs was asked to participate in the interview as a result of his substantial presence on several such sites, including Lawyers.com and LawGuru.com. Since it’s publication, it as been picked up and re-posted by several leading Law Firm Marketing firms including Stephen Fairley (@StephenFairley) on his “The Rainmaker Blog,” and Larry Bodine (@LarryBodine) on his “LawMarketing Blog.” Below is the full text of the interview, with a link to the originally-published article on LexisNexis.com. Bankruptcy Lawyer Sees New Business from Participation in Online Legal Advice Forum Feb 07, 2013 09:46 AM by Anand Pandya…

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Office Hours – 2013

For the year 2013, we’ve decided to publish in advance our planned office hours and closure days. Generally, our office is open Monday through Friday, from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM. From 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM our office staff takes a lunch break, so the phones may not be answered during that time. Our office will be closed in observance of the following holidays, which mirror the schedules for State and Federal Courts: January 21, 2013 – closed for MLK Day. February 18, 2013 – closed for President’s Day. March 29, 2013 – closed for Easter Weekend. May 27, 2013 – closed for Memorial Day. July 4-5, 2013 – closed in observance of Independence Day. September 2, 2013 – closed for Labor Day. October 14, 2013 – closed for Columbus Day. November 11, 2013 – closed for Veteran’s Day. November 27, 2013 – half-day, closed at noon for Thanksgiving….

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Divorce, Real Estate and Mortgages – What Nobody Tells You

I receive a lot of inquiries after divorces are finalized about real estate given to one spouse or another in a settlement or judgment, and how to remove the non-owner spouse from the mortgage. The typical scenario is that in the course of negotiating a property settlement, one spouse receives the house and by virtue of the property settlement, becomes solely liable for the mortgage. Later, for whatever reason, the spouse who received the home discovers that their former spouse’s name is still on the mortgage, and that the former-spouse not only is still liable for the mortgage but has access to the mortgage account! Lately, the question comes up frequently when a client is seeking a loan modification or attempting a short-sale. They discover to their horror that the former-spouse’s consent and participation is going to be necessary to finalize any sort of change to the loan. What happened,…

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